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Aims and agenda

Our speakers will lead a series of engaging discussions around the topic of Inclusive Policing. These sessions are designed to build our awareness, challenge our thinking and encourage us to share our own experiences and ideas.

Each theme will feature a panel of expert speakers, small breakout groups and a chance for personal reflections to allow more voices than ever before to be heard from across the LGBT+ Police Network.

For our three main themes, we will ask:

  • How can we become more inclusive as a network, offering more support to LGBT+ identifying colleagues who are not currently part of a local or regional network as well as working more closely with other LGBT+ networks in our communities to help make the police service more diverse in its make-up?
  • What more should we be doing, both as part of the national LGBT+ Police Network and also within our own police forces, to address the growing crisis of domestic violence and abuse?
  • What impact would we like to achieve as a network over the coming year? How might we each step up our personal leadership to achieve this, together with the wider allyship that we seek among colleagues and more widely across our local communities?

Each break out session is designed to encourage everyone to be honest and authentic, create confidence when sharing personal stories and insights, while showing empathy towards others whose approach might differ from our own.

We want everyone involved in this conference to feel involved and able to take away personal insights and resolves to bring us closer to our goal of more inclusive policing.

Agenda

09:00 – 09:10: Conference opens

Conference opens with music and video.

09:10 – 09:25: Welcome by Deputy Chief Constable Julie Cooke

Welcome to the conference by Deputy Chief Constable Julie Cooke, the National Police Chiefs’ Lead for LGBT+.

09:25 – 09:30: Guiding principles by Pete Ashby, independent facilitator

Brief introduction to our suggested guiding principles by Pete Ashby, independent facilitator for the day:

  1. We respect difference
  2. We commit to protecting our shared space as “safe space”
  3. We commit to being fully present
  4. We declare any “agenda” that might not be immediately obvious
  5. We are ready to challenge our own assumptions
  6. We demonstrate curiosity
  7. If we challenge others, we do so with kindness.
09:30 – 10:00: Theme 1 – Inclusion and support

How can we become more inclusive as a network and offer more support to LGBT+ identifying colleagues who are not currently part of a local or regional LGBT+ network for officers and staff?

This theme is introduced by the co-chairs of the National LGBT+ Police Network: Amy Tapping from Northumbria Police and Clinton Blackburn from City of London Police.

We encourage Amy and Clinton to challenge us as they share their personal answers to this question to stimulate the group discussions.

10:00 – 10:30: Break-out groups

In this first round of break-out groups, we ask you to consider two questions:

  1. If you were to think of one thing that your local police force or network has done over the past year that has had a positive impact on diversity and inclusion, what comes to mind first? Alternatively, has another force pioneered something new which should be shared? If you would like to share published materials for inclusion in the conference report, email LGBTPolicecon@avonandsomerset.police.uk.
  1. Is there anything in particular that you have learnt through collaborating with other networks working with other under-represented groups and we can encourage you to share? Collaboration is important when reaching out to individuals who experience multiple disadvantages and discrimination and are more likely to identify with role models with a number of protected characteristics. This is a great opportunity to share experiences and feed them in to the campaigns around ‘Safe to say’ and ‘Make your mark’ which support the Police Uplift Programme.


10:30 – 10:45: Break


10:45 – 11:20: Reflections

During this feedback session, we ask you to share your personal reflections about the topics discussed so far.

We would like to share your thinking in a way that helps us understand why you think as you do.

Questions to consider:

  • Do you have any thoughts or ideas about how you can ensure your police force becomes more inclusive of your local LGBT+ community?
  • Is there anything your local network has done during the pandemic that you are proud of and would like to acknowledge and share with others?
  • Going forward, is there anything you would like the National LGBT+ Police Network to do to help support LGBT+ officers and staff who currently feel isolated?
  • Is there anything that local and regional LGBT+ police networks could do to support LGBT+ officers and staff in neighbouring forces with under-developed networks? If your answer is yes, what ideas do you have that could empower others to strengthen their own local LGBT+ support networks?

11:20 – 11:50: Theme 2 – Domestic violence and abuse

What more should we be doing, both as part of the national LGBT + Police Network and also within our own police forces, to address the growing crisis of domestic violence and abuse?

This theme is introduced by Alison Lowe, Chief Executive of the Mental Health and Wellbeing charity Touchstone.

Alison was recently appointed as Deputy Mayor of West Yorkshire for Policing and Crime.  She is now Co-Chair of the Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Group of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners as well as holding various other APCC roles.

Alison will discuss the impact of COVID-19 on our mental health and wellbeing, as well as the disproportionately severe impact that it has had on individuals who identify as LGBT+.

We are very grateful to Alison for letting us have a background note providing recent evidence of poorer outcomes for the LGBT+ community. It helps to set the context for her speech, in which she will challenge us about how policing can become more compassionate, in its fullest sense.

Read the background note (PDF).

Our second speaker on this theme will be Matt Mahmood-Ogston.

Matt is a film-maker and award-winning LGBT+ campaigner, who founded the Naz and Matt Foundation in 2014 after his fiancé of thirteen years, Naz, tragically took his own life two days after he was confronted about his sexuality by his religious parents.

Matt and Naz’s story is powerfully told in an interview with the Guardian. This piece includes an interview that Matt gave on Sky News about the problems faced by many young men in religious communities in coming out to their families.

In recent years Matt has had extensive experience supporting members of the LGBT+ community who have been subject to abuse and violence in their family home.

We have asked him to challenge us on how the police might respond more effectively in those situations where officers are called into a home and believe that a gay member of the family might already be on the receiving end of religious homophobia and experiencing abuse.

11:50 – 12:20: Break-out groups

In this second round of break-out groups, we ask you to consider two questions:

  1. Please imagine that you are called into a situation, as a police officer, where you believe that there has been domestic violence or abuse involving someone who identifies as LGBT+. Some of you might have already experienced this and some others might feel that this takes some imagining! When that person later reflects on this experience, what sorts of words would you like them to associate with the role that you played?
  2. Can you please capture the two or three most important principles that you would like to see at the heart of our approach towards domestic violence and abuse?

12:20 – 13:00: Lunch break


13:00 – 13:45: Reflections

Back together as a single group, we share personal reflections as a result of this second round of small groups.

Your responses will enable us to think about what more we should all be doing to offer greater support to LGBT+ individuals who experience domestic abuse and violence.

When considering what sorts of ideas and suggestions you might put forward, remember there are a number of individuals attending the conference who are well placed to take credible ideas forward.

There is also an opportunity for cross-force collaboration in developing new strategies to help protect members of the LGBT+ community from the growing levels of violence and abuse they now face.

13:45 – 14:15: Theme 3 – Leadership and allyship

What impact would we like to achieve as a network over the coming year? How might we each step up our personal leadership to achieve this, together with the wider allyship that we seek among colleagues and more widely across our local communities?

This theme is introduced by Sarah Crew, T/Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Police and national police lead for adult sexual offences.

Sarah will reflect on what she sees as the key leadership challenges coming out of our discussions today, including:

  • Where can we make the greatest impact as leaders, and what are the key challenges that we need to focus on?
  • What do we need to ensure our vision of policing in the future is fully inclusive of the LGBT+ community?

Following Sarah we will hear from Pips (Phil or Pippa) Bunce, Director and Head of Global Markets Technology Core Engineering Strategic Programmes at Credit Suisse.

Pips is co-lead of the LGBT Ally programme at Credit Suisse, where they have many thousands of LGBT+ allies and can see the difference an effective ally programme makes to the culture of organisations.

Pips will discuss:

  • What she sees as the key challenges for the national, regional and local LGBT+ Police Networks if we are to play our part in ensuring that policing is truly inclusive and embraces all forms of diversity.
  • The importance of ally programmes in helping educate people on trans and non-binary identities, as well as fostering a greater sense of belonging for individuals.
  • The importance of role models among all groups and across all levels to empower everyone to bring their whole self to work. She will also discuss why diversity is to be celebrated and not just tolerated.

We are very grateful to Pips for letting us have a presentation that she has drawn up setting out her thinking on the power of LGBT+ allies (PDF).

14:15 – 14:45: Break-out groups

In this third round of break-out groups, we ask you to consider two questions:

  1. Would you be willing to step forward more over the coming year, and if so how, to help us achieve a greater impact as LGBT+ leaders and allies?
  2. What do you see as the two or three priority areas where you would like your own organisation and our local/ regional and national LGBT+ networks to concentrate their efforts over the next year?

14:45 – 15:00: Break


15:00 – 16:00: Final session – Reflections and summing up

In this final session, we hear personal reflections arising from your time in break-out groups.

We start by discussing what you think success should look like in terms of all that we hope to achieve.

We then invite you to capture one or two top personal take-aways. We hope that, taken together, they should put us in a better position to be there for each other and continue progressing towards our shared goal of inclusive policing.

At around 15:35 we will invite Amy Tapping to present the Award given in memory of former Greater Manchester Police officer Julie Barnes-Frank who died in 2017 and campaigned throughout her 30-year career to make the force more inclusive.

After the presentation we will invite Vanessa Jardine, who is taking over from Julie Cooke as the National Police Chiefs’ Lead for LGBT+ issues, to draw this session to a close by sharing her reflections on key messages and take-aways from the day.

The conference will end at 16:00.

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