Skip to content

Coronavirus (COVID-19): the policing response and what you need to know

Report domestic abuse

Domestic abuse can be abusive physical, emotional, psychological, financial or sexual behaviour between adults in a relationship or between family members.

If you are a victim of domestic abuse or know someone who is, report it to us:

Immediate danger

Call 999 if you feel you are in immediate danger and wait in a safe place for the police to arrive.

Can I find out if someone has been violent before?

Under the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme (known as Clare’s Law), the police can disclose information about someone’s history of domestic violence or violent acts.

You can make a request for information if you have concerns about your partner, or you are worried that someone you know may be in a relationship with a previously abusive partner.

To make a request, visit a police station or contact us on 101.

What happens after a report has been made?

If you feel ready and wish to report the abuse as a crime, the police will attend and investigate and as a result will potentially have several options available to them for dealing with your case. This may include issuing a Domestic Violence Protection Notice (DVPN) and a Domestic Violence Protection Order (DVPO).

Both processes are designed to give breathing space to victims by granting a temporary break from their abuser, allowing victims to get support.

What is a Domestic Violence Protection Notice?

A Domestic Violence Protection Notice (DVPN) is a notice served by the police against a person who is aged over 18, where the police reasonably believe that a person has been violent or has threatened violence against you and that you need to be protected.

The DVPN can:

  • stop them from coming near or into your home
  • stop them from making you leave or excluding you from your home
  • make them leave your home

A DVPN is usually the initial step taken by the police in appropriate cases and lasts until a Domestic Violence Protection Order (DVPO) is applied for at court, and this has to be done within 48 hours of the DVPN being served on the person.

A DVNP can be issued with or without your permission. However you will not have to go to court or give evidence if you do not want to.

Perpetrators can be arrested if they break the conditions of the DVPN. If the perpetrator breaks their conditions of the notice, contact us:

What is a Domestic Violence Protection Order?

A DVPN will be followed up by a Domestic Violence Protection Order (DVPO) which the police apply for within 48 hours of the DVPN being served.

DVPOs are issued by a Magistrates’ Court and served on the person by a police officer. The order will be in place for between 14 and 28 days and the aim is to allow some distance between the parties to allow for clear thinking and assessment of the situation.

A DVPO can be issued with or without your permission. However you will not have to go to court or give evidence if you do not want to.

Perpetrators can be arrested if they break the conditions of the DVPO. If the perpetrator breaks their conditions of the order, contact us:


Support for victims

View details of organisations who can support you.

Page feedback
Was this page useful? *
What best describes the reason for your visit today?